Tag: virtual training

Presented by John Yasenchak, Ed.D.

Friday, November 5, 2021 or Friday, November 19, 2021

8:30am-4:00pm

About This Training

There is no doubt that the pandemic has pushed helping professionals toward new levels of technological competence. Every advance in technology raises new levels of ethical awareness. Often, technology seems to outpace the development of ethical standards. Bots, apps, AI, avatars, telehealth—how do we keep up with it all? 



In this workshop, we will look toward the future of the helping professions and examine the impact that technology will have on our practice. We will review basic professional ethical norms, apply them to emerging trends and present a model for ethical decision making. We will also explore the philosophy of transhumanism and how its assumptions impact the fundamental questions our profession has been asking since its inception: “What does it mean to be human? Why should I be ethical?”



Ultimately, this will be an opportunity to reflect on our relationship to technology and its application to mental health and substance use counseling. It will also be an opportunity to reflect on how we view the service we provide in the context of our rapidly changing techno-culture. 

Training Details 

Registration now open!


Location: Online event 

Time: 8:30 am – 4:00 pm

Dates: Friday, November 5, 2021 OR Friday, November 19, 2021 

Cost: FREE for Health Affiliates Maine affiliates
$59 for clinicians not affiliated with HAM

Register here for Friday, November 5 session!

Register here for Friday, November 19 session!

About the Presenter 

John Yasenchak, Ed.D., holds a doctorate in Counselor Education from the University of Maine as well as a masters degree in philosophy, a course he also taught from 1982-1985. He has been teaching graduate counseling courses since 1996 and has been a practicing clinical counselor and supervisor in a variety of clinical settings since 1985. His expertise is in clinical mental health counseling.

Dr. Yasenchak’s experience includes inner city work with co-occurring disorders, university student development, and 20 years as clinical supervisor for a Native American counseling facility. Currently, he provides consultation and training services and is a contributing faculty member of Walden University.

Dr. Yasenchak’s primary areas of interest are in mental health and addictions counseling. He also has specific interests in spirituality and religion in the practice of counseling, as well as in digital ethics.

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This class meets the requirements for Domain 1, Behavioral, Psychological and Rehabilitation Intervention Models of the Maine MHRT/Community curriculum.

  • Tickets: $300
  • Location: Online Event
  • Presented By: Mary Gagnon, LMFT
  • Registration: Register Online
  • Refund Policy: Refunds up to 7 days before event

Do I Need This Training?

The MHRT/C certification is a Maine-based certification for mental health professionals wishing to work directly in patient care. Consider this MHRT/C training if:

  • You wish to work in Maine as a case worker, in a group home, or community support work
  • You currently do not have a college degree that included all accredited coursework
  • You need continuing education credits relating to ethics and professional conduct
  • You are working towards a provisional or full MHRT/C and need priority domain training

About this Event

This course will examine the knowledge, attitudes, and skills Mental Health Technicians need to establish rapport, communicate effectively and respectfully, and work collaboratively with consumers regarding their care to support recovery, with awareness of changing needs across the lifespan.

The following training objectives will be studied:

  1. Explain the concept of community inclusion and the use of natural supports to enhance recovery.
  2. Relate human development theory, including the interaction of social, psychosocial development across the lifespan./li>
  3. Give examples of evidence‐based models and approaches that integrate treatment and rehabilitation.
  4. Demonstrate general knowledge of the current diagnostic manual and be able to name basic diagnostic categories.
  5. Define the treatment complexities for co‐occurring disorders and addictions within vulnerable populations.
  6. Identify community resources to assist in the recovery process for individuals who have co‐occurring mental health and substance use disorders.
  7. Recognize the consumer’s development and life stage, and where they are in relation to the Stages of Change Model, in order to develop individualized treatment plans.
  8. Be aware of common strengths‐based assessments, including instruments that identify or screen for co‐occurring disorders and/or trauma history, and tools that evaluate the level of care needs.
  9. Demonstrate a collaborative, person‐centered, recovery‐oriented, shared decision‐making approach to working with consumers. Identify strengths and challenges and how to incorporate natural supports into individualized treatment plans.
  10. Describe common factors of effective helping strategies when working with consumers, e.g., therapeutic relationship, empowerment, consumer choice, and respect for the consumer.
  11. Demonstrate active listening skills, basic interviewing skills, and demonstrate respect for the consumer at all times.
  12. Illustrate an understanding of crisis planning, advance directives, crisis intervention strategies, and use of a warm line.

Course Expectations

1. Attendance:

Students must attend each day of class and receive an 80% or above on the final exam to earn a certificate of completion.

2. Make‐up work:

Students must attend all classes as stated above and complete and submit any missed assignments.

3. Class size:

The standardized MHRT/C curricula are interactive. The recommendation is that classes have no fewer than 6 participants and no more than 20./p>

4. Class participation guidelines:

  1. Students will arrive on time and stay until the end
  2. Students will demonstrate respect for others.
  3. Use first person language, such as “I” messages. [For example, “I didn’t understand his response to my question” as opposed to “He overreacted to my question.”] This allows students to take responsibility for their feelings and experiences rather than blame them on someone else.
  4. Cell phones should be placed on vibrate or silenced at all times during the class.
  5. Students are expected to participate in all activities.

5. Course evaluations

Participants will receive a link to complete an online evaluation the last day of their training.

About the Presenter:

Mary Gagnon, LMFT, is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist and the Training and Clinical Development Specialist for Health Affiliates Maine. Mary has worked in private practice as well as a variety of community mental health settings throughout her career. Her most recent work at Health Affiliates Maine includes oversight of clinicians in private practice and development and facilitation of trainings for schools and conferences throughout the state. She is a certified trainer for Domains 1, 2, 3, 4 and 6 for the MHRT/C Non-Academic Curriculum.

Register Online

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