Articles & Trainings

Dear Attendees,

Due to our first presumptive case of COVID-19 in Maine and recommendations to postpone large gatherings, at this time we are POSTPONING all three of our “Working Successfully with Personality Disorders in Therapy” workshops. We will look to reschedule these as soon as we are able.

If you would like your order refunded to you, please e-mail Mary Gagnon at mary.gagnon@healthaffiliatesmaine.com to make the request. Please give the refund process a few days to occur if you make that selection. Otherwise, we will hold your order until we reschedule this training.

Thank you for your understanding.
Sincerely, Mary A. Gagnon, LMFT Training and Clinical Development Specialist

LewistonFri, March 13, 2020 from 8:00 AM – 4:00 PM
Franco Center
46 Cedar Street
Lewiston, ME
Register
PortlandFri, March 20, 2020 from 8:00 AM – 4:00 PM
Italian Heritage Center
40 Westland Avenue
Portland, ME
Register
OronoFri, March 27, 2020 from 8:00am – 4:00pm
Black Bear Inn
4 Godfrey Drive
Orono, ME
Register

Deepen your knowledge of personality disorders with this one-day training, in which we’ll discuss diagnosis, myths, biases, tools, and more.

About this Event

Working Successfully with Personality Disorders in Therapy: Decreasing Myths, Increasing Clinical Effectiveness and Tools to Use in Your Practice

Clients who present with personality disorders can be some of the most difficult and challenging clients that mental health providers engage with. These clients present with disrupted interpersonal relationships, self-harming and suicidal crises, difficulties regulating their emotions and an unstable sense of self. Without the right skills and support clinicians often find themselves feeling exhausted and frustrated when working with these diagnoses. Through this training clinicians will deepen their knowledge of personality disorders and discuss differential diagnoses. Clinicians will be able to challenge their preconceived notions and myths regarding this population. Clinicians will be provided with tools to enhance and freshen their skills set when working with personality disorders in a therapeutic setting.

Objectives:

  • Understand myths, biases and judgments related to personality disorders
  • Review diagnostic criteria, differential diagnosis and co-occurring disorders
  • Learn therapeutic interventions to use in clinical practice to increase therapeutic effectiveness and client engagement
  • Develop an understanding of healthy and effective boundaries to set in an effort to decrease therapist burn-out

Outline:

8:30 What do we know about personality disorders: Exploring biases and myths
9:00 Understanding personality disorders in clinical practice
10:15 Break
10:30 Evidence-based treatments and personality disorders
11:15 Exploring ways to implement clinical interventions
12:00 Lunch
1:00 Exploring ways to implement clinical interventions
2:15 Break
2:30 Case Conceptualization
3:00 Maintaining professional boundaries: decreasing therapist burnout and practicing self-care
4:00 Conclusion

About the Presenter

Katelyn Baxter-Musser is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker in private practice in Gorham. There she provides individual therapy, couples and family therapy and consultation to mental health professionals. Katelyn has been in the field for over ten years and has worked in a variety of different roles including as a case manager, child and family therapist, trauma therapist and clinical coordinator. Prior to being in private practice Katelyn has worked for several agencies as well as Native American reservations. In her private practice Katelyn specializes in working with domestic violence, abuse, trauma, PTSD, depression, anxiety, grief and relationship issues, dissociative disorders and personality disorders. Katelyn is a Certified Dialectical Behavior Therapist and a Certified EMDR therapist. Katelyn is trained in a variety of therapeutic modalities including DBT, EMDR, CBT, mindfulness and motivational interviewing. She sits on the EMDRIA Standards and Training Committee and is the co-regional coordinator for the EMDR Southern Maine Regional Network.

 

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Jay Burrows, LCPC, LADC, CCS
Jay Burrows is a Licensed Professional Counselor, a Licensed Alcohol Drug Counselor and Certified Clinical Supervisor. In addition to providing counseling services to clients, Jay assists his colleagues and helps to develop their counseling skills.

Jay attended the University of Southern Maine for his undergraduate degree and for his Master of Science in Counseling with a Clinical Mental Health Concentration. Prior to graduation, Jay completed his internship at a residential program treating mental health disorders along with co-occurring substance use disorders. After graduation, Jay joined Catholic Charities Counseling Services in Portland as a clinical counselor providing outpatient services. He stayed with Catholic Charities for more than eight years. During this time, Jay worked with a co-occurring population who were often incarcerated or involved in the criminal justice system.

This experience led Jay to establish an Intensive Outpatient Group at Catholic Charities, which he facilitated for five years. Here he helped people gain more pro-social attitudes and behaviors, increasing their ability to successfully reintegrate into their communities and decrease their rates of recidivism.

In his role as clinical supervisor at HAM, Jay is dedicated to helping colleagues deliver quality services to their clients while also developing strong professional ethics. He also mentors clinical internship students, preparing them for a future in case work.

Outside work, Jay can be found reading a captivating book or volunteering with his community’s little league. He spends his summers traveling to Bar Harbor with his wife and four children.   

 

Lindsay McKeen, LCSW, CCS
Lindsay McKeen is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker and Certified Clinical Supervisor. In this role, Lindsay reviews client treatment plans, clinical records and the professional concerns and goals of other practitioners.

After attending the University of Maine Orono for her undergraduate degrees in social work and psychology, she then earned her Master of Social Work from the University of New England in Portland. Since then she has worked as a clinician at St. Mary’s Regional Medical Center in Lewiston in the Psych and Chemical Dependency Unit. While there, Lindsay used a strengths-based approach with her clients to identify their goals and treatment plans.

Lindsay received the “Service Star Employee” and “MVP” awards while at St. Mary’s. She is a lifelong learner, always looking to continue her education and professional career (ask her how quickly she can solve a Rubik’s cube)! She has completed many professional trainings including trauma-informed care in behavioral health, cognitive behavioral therapy certification, ethics in boundary setting, motivational interviewing, and art interventions for addiction, anxiety and chronic pain.

When away from work, Lindsay’s favorite place to disconnect is Rangeley, Maine, where she can rejuvenate and be one with nature. There you can find her hand-feeding chipmunks, watching birds and indulging her creative, artsy side.

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Studies have shown that adults with severe mental illness have a shorter lifespan than adults without a diagnosis by an average of 25 years. Additionally, 68% of adults with a mental health diagnosis have at least one chronic disease that limits their daily functioning.

Behavioral Health Home (BHH) programs are evidence-based care-coordination programs designed to reduce the impact of preventable diseases in people with mental health diagnoses by ensuring the coordination of medical and mental health treatment.

This coordination is done by BHH team members, including a wellness coordinator, peer/parent support person, nurse, consulting psychiatrist and primary care provider. The common goal is to address the gaps between physical health and mental health care plans.

BHH participation, when delivered with core principals, improves the outcomes of the individuals served—reducing emergency care visits and hospitalizations and increasing overall quality of life.

How can BHH help my client?

  • BHH creates treatment plans that address client life experiences, chronic stressors, poverty and isolation to reduce the risk of premature death.
  • A BHH team shows clients how to self-manage physical and mental health symptoms through education, coaching, forming support systems and connecting to community resources.
  • Emergency room use, appointment attendance and medication refills are monitored, and clients who have had two or more refills of antipsychotic medications have their blood sugars monitored.
  • Educational and peer support for adults in the program, and support to parents with children in the program, gives clients and their families the opportunity to learn from each other and to foster a sense of belonging and community engagement.

How does it benefit me as a healthcare provider to recommend BHH to my client?

  • Unlike other case management programs, BHH is an easier program to access. It does not require specific criteria relating to mental health diagnoses and you don’t need to write a section 17 letter.
  • The BHH team will ensure that the tools used during a client’s session encourage positive treatment outcomes, and that they continue to use the tools in their home and community.
  • Clients that struggle with chronic illness also struggle to attend appointments. As clients begin to feel better, they find it easier to attend sessions and take advantage of other resources available in the program.

Why HAM is the right BHH provider to partner with.

  • We don’t have a waitlist. We will assign your client within 24 hours and have a team member see them within 4-7 days.
  • We are not case management as usual. We worked with Maine Quality Counts to help design an effective program that adheres to the highest standards of BHH. We are fully committed to model fidelity.
  • We welcome client feedback and offer the ability to participate on an advisory board.
  • Our partnerships are important. We will be proactive in our collaboration with you and you can reach us at any time.
  • We collaborate with other case management programs. If we aren’t the right fit for your client, we will transfer them appropriately. (If your client would benefit from Section 13 or 17, they may still want to continue with BHH to work on self-management skills.)
  • We regularly consult with psychiatrists and primary care providers to ensure that we are educated and that we understand the impact of client treatment plans and interactions.

Do clients need to have a chronic illness to benefit from BHH?

No. If you have clients with mental health diagnoses and they are having challenges at school, work, home or community related environments, BHH can offer them help. The BHH program allows us to work on prevention activities that help with the overall well-being of your client such as nutrition, stress relief, physical activity and tobacco cessation.

Does my client need to have MaineCare?

Yes. A client must have full eligibility in MaineCare to qualify for BHH.

How do I refer a client?

We offer BHH services in Androscoggin County, and are accepting referrals for adults in Oxford and Southern Franklin County and surrounding communities.

Referrals can be made by calling us at (207) 333-3278 or (877) 888-4304. Click here for our online referral form. 

References:
Reisinger-Walker, E & Druss, B. (2011, February). Mental health disorders and medical co-morbidity. The Synthesis Project. Retrieved from: http://www.integration.samsha.gov/workforce

The Center for Integrated Health Solutions, SAMSHA-HRSA. (2012, May). Behavioral health homes for people with mental health and substance abuse conditions: The core clinical features. Retrieved at: http://www.integration.samsha.gov/workforce

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Soon “Empty Nest” Has Dad Sad

Our youngest child is a senior in high school and I am looking at a future empty nest with a heavy heart. My wife is the opposite and talking about our retirement years and being kid-free.

This article originally appeared in Macaroni Kid on December 12th, 2019 by Luanne Starr Rhoades, LCPC, LADC, CCS; Health Affiliates Maine

Question: Our youngest child is a senior in high school and I am looking at a future empty nest with a heavy heart. My wife is the opposite and talking about our retirement years and being kid-free. I know she will miss the kids too but seems almost gleeful about it being just us. I love my wife and look forward to those years but am also pretty sad about losing our kids. How do I address it best with her to maybe tone down the glee and recognize I may have some tough feelings around our empty nest?

Answer: I think like you. Having my children around, as little ones or adults, is one of the joys of my life. I have found that doesn’t change even though they no longer live under my roof. This time of having children transition to adulthood affects everyone differently. For some, the “Empty Nest Syndrome” is characterized by sadness and even depression, while others may view it as “Empty Nest Symphony” as one feels the lightening of responsibility and a newfound freedom. Most people experience both ways of feeling to some degree.  It is one of those life transitions that take time.

This would be a great time to have a conversation with your wife. Try to really understand what this means to her. After years of insisting that homework get done, teeth get brushed, or they get up and off to school, she may be looking forward to not being responsible for everyone. Enjoying being with you, and having time to herself, may have been put on the back burner.

I also urge you to talk with her about your feelings about having the kids gone, and that it is harder for you. If it is difficult for you to ask her to “tone down the glee,” it may point to a larger issue of needing to find each other again. All parents should work hard to not make their kids be the only focus in their relationship with each other. This is hard to do. It takes an effort to continue to have your personal interests, and those interests you share as a couple, once you have children. Setting aside time for each other without kids, through the years, will help when the empty nest comes around.

Try not to think of having your kids move out as a hard stop. Your relationships with them should continue. Enjoying your children as adults can be a new kind of fun. Your children will also need you for many reasons in their young adult lives. Try to view each stage of their lives as new beginnings, not endings. If your adult children plan to live close to you, make some family time together each week. Before long more children may come along to enrich your life. 

Right now, take on the new project of making the most of the marriage that produced those children you have enjoyed so much.  There is a richness there that needs to be rediscovered. The goal is to grow together in the empty nest. Through the child raising years, people grow and change. Many couples seek counseling to help them rekindle those connections which brought them together pre-kids, and to learn to enjoy each other again. Don’t hesitate to seek support in the process, and if you continue to struggle with this transition, seek help for yourself.

Luanne Starr Rhoades, LCPC, LADC, CCS is a professional counselor and the Outpatient Therapy Director at Health Affiliates Maine, a mental health and substance abuse treatment agency serving adults, adolescents, children and families. For more information or if you or someone you know needs help, call us at 877-888-4304 or visit our website www.healthaffiliatesmaine.com and click on “Referrals.”

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Beyond Baby Blues: Sister is Worried About Sister

My sister had a baby two months ago and I am concerned she may have postpartum depression.

This article originally appeared in Macaroni Kid on November 27th, 2019 by Luanne Starr Rhoades, LCPC, LADC, CCS; Health Affiliates Maine

Question: My sister had a baby two months ago and I am concerned she may have postpartum depression. She is very overwhelmed, angry and sad. She is very loving toward my niece and I don’t worry about her harming the baby but she seems beyond the “baby blues.” I’ve brought it up to her a couple of times and am met with defensiveness. I can’t help but worry and want to be there for her; just not sure how to best do that. Thanks.

Answer: It is great that your sister has a sister who is so caring, and is looking out for her. You are right to be concerned, because this is a change in her normal behavior, at a time when you would expect she would be joyful. New motherhood is full of emotions and being overwhelmed is a normal feeling. Becoming a parent for the first time is a life changing experience which makes going forward feel very intimidating. This can be so overwhelming. Hormonally, the body is readjusting to not being pregnant. Many new moms worry their bodies will never be the same. Most new parents don’t feel equipped for this great responsibility of child-raising, no matter how prepared they may have thought they were. There may also be other circumstances in her life or relationship, which may be contributing to feeling angry and sad. Recognizing this might help you understand.

Here are some of the symptoms of postpartum depression (these symptoms can be present in new dads, too):

–Depressed mood or mood swings
–Crying spells
–Social Withdrawal
–Feeling Overwhelmed
–Altered eating and sleeping
–Sadness
–Loss of interest in sex
–Overwhelming exhaustion

Postpartum Depression that becomes a medical emergency:

–Unable to sleep
–Confused
–Hallucinations/delusions
–Obsessive and fearful about the baby
–Paranoid thinking
–Refusing to eat
–Thought of harming self or baby

Resource:https://www.webmd.com/depression/postpartum-depression/default.htm

We cannot force people to get help unless they have the potential to harm themselves or someone else. As best as you can; continue to be there for her. Support her as she gains more skill in providing for her child’s needs. Reach out to those in her circle who might also be able to support her with love and patience. Don’t allow her to push you and others away, even when she is irritable and angry, which means not taking offense or walking out. When possible, take the baby and give her time to take care of herself, by napping, bathing, or going for a run. Helping to connect her to other new moms could prove very helpful in just realizing she is not the only one struggling. Lastly, as with most problems, don’t try to fix it, JUST LISTEN, and if she doesn’t want to talk, then just be there. This is real sister time, I wish you the best in your efforts to help.  

Luanne Starr Rhoades, LCPC, LADC, CCS is a professional counselor and the Outpatient Therapy Director at Health Affiliates Maine, a mental health and substance abuse treatment agency serving adults, adolescents, children and families. For more information or if you or someone you know needs help, call us at 877-888-4304 or visit our website www.healthaffiliatesmaine.com and click on “Referrals.”

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Sad red-haired girl

The Emotional Ripple Effect of Someone’s Suicide

I have a tough subject to talk with you about: the extreme and extensive impact of a loved one’s suicide.

This article originally appeared in Macaroni Kid on November 20th, 2019 by Luanne Starr Rhoades, LCPC, LADC, CCS; Health Affiliates Maine

I have a tough subject to talk with you about: the extreme and extensive impact of a loved one’s suicide.

Suicide is always shockingly sad anytime we hear of it, whether we know the person or not.  When it happens to someone we care about, like our spouse, parent, a brother or sister, a child or teenager, a neighbor, cousin, uncle, aunt, coworker or friend, it knocks the wind out of us, like a punch in the gut.  It is hard enough to lose someone in the normal course of living, but to lose them to suicide is immeasurably hard to grasp.  It is an unexpected ending and our lives are suddenly changed.    

When someone is the one left behind by a suicide they experience so many emotions, unusual circumstances, awkward conversations, and they have so many questions, most of which have no good answers.  If this were to happen to you, here are some things you may experience:

You may have to endure a police investigation. A police investigation can be unsettling, especially when you’re grieving.  The police have to investigate and they are looking for information, but because of the shock and confusion, giving answers may be difficult.  

You may feel confused, forgetful, or exhausted. A typical reaction to traumatic events is to feel confused or forgetful. You may forget to do your usual routines, like eating or brushing your teeth.  You may feel like you can’t think straight.  You may experience extreme exhaustion (as is typical with emotional pain), yet sleep can be elusive.

You may feel abandoned, left alone by someone you thought cared.  You may wonder, “Didn’t they care about me?” and “Why wasn’t my loving them, enough? Why didn’t they come to me?” Children may wonder what they did wrong.

You may be in denial and not believe that this actually happened, and that it was actually a suicide. 

You may feel numb and feel nothing.  You may even think you have gotten over the event.  Then, suddenly, you are living it with intense emotion.

You may have regrets about not having known they were in serious trouble.  Some people present as fine on the outside and are torn-up with despair on the inside.  Sometimes they work really hard to hide these feelings from loved ones.  I have known many people who say “I wear a mask.”

You may feel guilt or responsibility.  “If only I had…” and “If I would have/could have done something, they would still be here.” 

You may be angry.  You may be very angry–at the person (“How could she do this?” “How could he throw away his beautiful life?”) or at those who you feel should have helped (“Why didn’t the doctor/the school/the counselor do something?”) It is no one’s fault, and certainly not yours.

Your faith may be rocked. “How could God let this happen?”

You may feel shame about it and not want it to be public knowledge.  There is stigma which makes us not want to share when we or a loved one struggles with mental illness.  Our society has equated emotional suffering with weakness.

You may feel relief, which often leads to feeling more shame because you do feel relief.  When someone is depressed to the point of suicide it affects everyone around them.  Their depression can make us feel hopeless and anxious.

You may feel depressed, and alone in your grief.

Emerging after someone’s suicide takes time.  It is best to allow yourself time to grieve, to feel what you feel, and to talk about your questions with a counselor, pastor, or a caring friend.  Don’t do it alone.  If you feel depressed, or in spiritual despair, seek help.  If you feel suicidal, seek help. 

This person you have loved was part of your world.  Talk about your loved one by remembering the good times, as well as the bad times.  This can help with healing.  Say their name.  It keeps them alive in your heart.  Eventually you will come to your own acceptance and peace.  Be gentle with yourself.

 

Suicide Hotline:  1-800-273-8255             Maine Crisis Hotline   1-888-568-1112

 

Luanne Starr Rhoades, LCPC, LADC, CCS is a professional counselor and the Outpatient Therapy Director at Health Affiliates Maine, a mental health and substance abuse treatment agency serving adults, adolescents, children and families. For more information or if you or someone you know needs help, call us at 877-888-4304 or visit our website www.healthaffiliatesmaine.com and click on “Referrals.”

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This weekend Andrea Krebs, Executive Director and Kate Marble, Case Management Program Director from Health Affiliates Maine proudly accepted the NAMI Maine Outstanding Partner Agency award on HAMs behalf.

HAM is dedicated to working toward the mission of reducing stigma, spreading awareness and creating access to supports for people in Maine effected by mental health struggles. We are happy to support NAMI and honored to work toward these shared goals for the people we serve.

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Teen’s Mood Has Mom Confused

How do you tell the difference between teenage moodiness and depression?

This article originally appeared in Macaroni Kid on October 28th, 2019 by Luanne Starr Rhoades, LCPC, LADC, CCS; Health Affiliates Maine

Question: How do you tell the difference between teenage moodiness and depression? My son has been very tired, withdrawn, and sulky since school started. I ask him about school and he says everything is fine. He has friends and is in sports. His grades are fine. When I ask if he is feeling down, he says no and that he’s just tired. It seems like more than being tired or teenage moodiness though. How do I tell the difference?

Answer: You are doing a good job, mom, at paying attention! That is the key to finding an answer to your first question. There seems to be a lot going on here. Some of what is happening may be quite normal and age appropriate, while some may indicate some intervention is needed.  

Many parents are alarmed when their sweet-natured, family-oriented young teen turns, seemingly overnight, into a dark, moody stranger who wants nothing to do with the family. This is also the time when many things parents say are met with rolling eyes and disbelief. The good news; they usually grow out of this. This can be is part of a teen’s developmental task, which is moving toward becoming an adult and separating from parents. The teen years, with the help of hormones, can be full of testing, pulling away, moodiness and pushing boundaries, as they struggle to be different from their parents. It can be a baffling time for parents and really baffling for the teens. The emotions and uncertainty may cause them to experiment with risky behaviors, and affect their feelings about themselves, their world view, and sense of belonging. Sometimes they are overwhelmed by it all and can become moody and depressed, often isolating themselves from family activities and friends. 

Most of the difficulties with teen behavior are episodic, meaning they may have periods of moodiness but also are able to move on from that. So consider how long the moodiness has been going on. If he is able to pull himself out of it and have some periods of a lighter mood it is less serious than if it is prolonged.

The concerning part of your description of your son is about his tiredness. I recommend he have a health check-up to make sure there is nothing physically going on. Many things can cause fatigue. He may be staying up late studying, being online or playing video games. Is he tired from the sports workouts and staying up late to finish homework? If so, there will need to be some monitoring to ensure he is getting more regular sleep. Signs that there may be a problem are if he is spending an unusual amount of time sleeping or he is taking frequent naps. This could indicate depression or another health issue.

Here are some other important questions to consider. How you answer these questions may help you know what you need to do.  

  • Is he spending time with his friends? Are they old friends or new friends?  
  • Is there a special relationship starting or stopping? 
  • Is he feeling bullied or otherwise intimidated at school?  
  • Is his behavior different outside home?  
  • Is he engaged in activities that you have not previously seen him engage in? 
  • Is he pushing you away with his mood, so you won’t recognize that he may be using substances like alcohol, marijuana and other drugs?  
  • Does the school report that he attends regularly?  
  • Has anyone else noticed any change in his behavior?
  • Is he complaining of physical symptoms like stomachaches and headaches? 

Your teen may not choose to talk to you about any of this. If you suspect there is more behind his tiredness, if his symptoms are prolonged, or if he is losing interest in school, friends, sports, etc., then have him screened for depression. Your PCP is the first place to start. Lastly, many teens benefit from seeing a counselor who can be help them navigate the transition into adulthood. There are many counselors who work with youth, both male and female. It is difficult when a parent knows that something is making their teen struggle. I wish the best for you, and him.  

Luanne Starr Rhoades, LCPC, LADC, CCS is a professional counselor and the Outpatient Therapy Director at Health Affiliates Maine, a mental health and substance abuse treatment agency serving adults, adolescents, children and families. For more information or if you or someone you know needs help, call us at 877-888-4304 or visit our website www.healthaffiliatesmaine.com and click on “Referrals.”

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Christine Rogerson

Ethics, Decision Making, and Our Professional Commitment to Social Justice

Training events from late November to early December in Orono, Falmouth & Lewiston.

OronoFri, November 8, 2019 from 8:00am – 4:00pm
Black Bear Inn
4 Godfrey Drive
Orono, ME
Register
FalmouthFri, December 6, 2019 from 8:00 AM – 4:00 PM
The Woodlands Club
39 Woods Road
Falmouth, ME
Register
LewistonFri, December 13, 2019 from 8:00 AM – 4:00 PM
Franco Center
46 Cedar Street
Lewiston, ME
Register

About the Program

The world seems to be spinning faster and faster these days, and the call to social justice greater and greater. As clinicians, what is our responsibility to social justice? What is our role in pursuing social change? How do we wade through the ethical quagmires? This workshop will assist clinicians in defining social change, identifying the roles we play in upholding social justice, and explore the ethical decision making process as it relates to social change.

Exposure to violence and abuse also has implications for the healers including safety concerns and compassion fatigue. We will consider personal and systemic support for professional resiliency.

Objectives for the day:

  1. Define Social Justice and identify the role we as helping professional play
  2. Explore Codes of Ethics and identify steps to ethical decision making
  3. Determine strategies to elicit our professional responsibility to social justice

Agenda for the day

8:30 Opening Introductions & Ice breaker
9:00 What is Social Justice?
10:15 Break
10:30 Ethics
12:00 Lunch
1:00 Ethical Decision Making
2:15 Break
2:30 Ethics & Our Commitment to Social Justice
3:45 So now what?
4:00 Conclusion

About the Presenter

Christine Rogerson, LCSW

A graduate of the University of Maine at Orono with a Bachelor of Arts in psychology, Christine Rogerson earned her Master of Social Work from the University of New England. Currently, she is pursuing a PhD. in social work at Simmons University and is a Field Practicum Coordinator for the University of New England’s Master of Social Work program. Christine’s work in education at the University of New England is robust, having served as an academic advisor, a visiting clinical assistant professor, and an adjunct faculty member. Particularly knowledgeable when it comes to social justice, Christine recently taught a course at Simmons on racism and oppression.

Christine’s clinical work is also extensive. She has spent a decade as a clinician working with families and children through school-based counseling, behavioral health agencies, and in the hospital setting.

Committed to her community and to giving back, her service includes a seat on the Board of Directors of Sweetser as a Corporator, as a representative to the York Diversity Council, and as a LEND Grant inter-professional team member representing social work in a pediatric neurology clinic.

OronoFri, November 8, 2019 from 8:00am – 4:00pm
Black Bear Inn
4 Godfrey Drive
Orono, ME
Register
FalmouthFri, December 6, 2019 from 8:00 AM – 4:00 PM
The Woodlands Club
39 Woods Road
Falmouth, ME
Register
LewistonFri, December 13, 2019 from 8:00 AM – 4:00 PM
Franco Center
46 Cedar Street
Lewiston, ME
Register

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Coronavirus/COVID-19 Alert - The health and safety of our affiliates, staff, case managers, and clients is our top priority. Our COVID-19 Updates page provides current information about how we are working together to help keep our communities safe. Learn More

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